FootStar.org helpful text archive

Game vision [en]

Posted on: 19 January, 2008

Players with low game vision will find it harder to analyze the field around them as often as players with high game vision will. This has influence, for example, in the awareness of player distances that is very useful for passing & dribbling (it does not affect players when they are marking, so don’t make this question =p !!)

Game vision “expands” the circle of field around you you’re able to see and your judgements are made based on that.
For instance, in v2 (and to some extent v1, although it is less noticeable due to lame coding ), if you see 1 player ahead and upwards, you’ll try to dribble downwards; if you lack game vision, you might not see him and dribble to the front instead, making it possible for that player to approach you more quickly.

The bit about passes is also correct, as everyone knows (or should).

This said, I believe game vision will be essential for almost all players in the field, especially the most attack-minded. Although v2 relies less on dribbling, it still is an important part of the game.

When a player decides to check if he can pass the ball, he checks everyone on his team to assess who is in better position to receive the pass. This depends on a variety of things (chance of the pass being intercepted, if the player is free on the pitch, what’s his position in relation to the goal, etc.).
Depending on each player and his IOs, each one of the little “checks” has a different weight. In the end, all the values are multiplied by the appropriate weight and added together.
Game vision comes along right then, in order to “scramble” that value. The higher the game vision, the higher a random seed will be when creating a number that is afterwards added or subtracted from the “player passing value”.
In the end, a player will either pass the ball to the player with the highest value or do something else with it if there’s no one with a sufficiently high value (depending on the situation).
Game vision also plays a role when the chance of a pass to get intercepted is calculated: players can’t see past a certain “circle” to assess if the pass is likely to be intercepted or not. So, it’s likely that long passes are sometimes “overrated” by poor game vision (a player sees the pass is not going to be intercepted in a certain radius around him, but can’t “see” a player just out of that radius, near the way of the pass to a player far away).

So basically, game vision can lead to players over or underevaluating some passing opportunities.

/

Game Vision – the higher this skill is, the bigger the radius of the pitch around him can a player “see” and assess the situation so he can make decisions. Indeed, this skill serves an important part when it comes to dribbling and passing. Dribblers will benefit from it since if they can “see” more players, they’ll know better in what direction they should dribble; passers benefit since they’ll be able to assess better to which player they should pass, providing a lethal weapon if combined with high passing skills when it comes to deciding if a player is in a very dangerous position and probably worth half a goal just by so.

Also GV makes the player “think” faster. Players with low GV have more difficulties in knowing if a certain player is near them or not. This has some nasty effects such as players of the same team fighting for the ball or stupid passes when they are clear on goal.

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